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VIDEO: Bobi Wine raises Ugandan flag with performance at Rebel Salute music festival in Jamaica

Bobi Wine speaks at the Rebel Salute festival in Jamaica.

Singer Bobi Wine, who is a Member of Parliament for Kyadondo East over the weekend performed at the Rebel Salute Festival at Grizzly’s Plantation Cove located in St Ann Parish, Jamaica.

Bobi Wine who was invited to perform at the two-day Reggae, Ragga and Dance hall Festival donned a maroon kitenge outfit complete with a red beret. For a moment the stage was filled with Ugandan flags as the Kyarenga singer spurt reggae rhymes laced with strong political statements. Bobi Wine was clearly never overawed by the occasion, and performed with a confidence that went over well with the audience.

“Just a few months ago, simply because I speak the truth the military government sent the military to arrest me and shoot my driver and they arrest me and beat me and put me in military detention? Why? Because I speak the truth. They think they can intimidate me. They forget, I was born in the ghetto. I grew up in the ghetto. I suffered in the ghetto. I died in the ghetto and I resurrected from the ghetto,” Bobi Wine said to the thousands of people in attendance.

Midway through his performance, he took time out to lash out against the Ugandan government that he said is oppressing the people. He claimed he was being framed by the government who he said arrested him after planting two high-powered assault rifles in a hotel room he occupied.

“After being poor, and by 22 owning beach front property, I thought I had achieved something. But when I looked back and saw all of my childhood friends living in poverty, I realized that wasn’t all,” Bobi said. “I realised I had to use my music to uplift the people. As a child growing up, I watched videos of Sting, (Reggae) Sunsplash and most importantly Rebel Salute. Those videos inspired me to use my music to uplift my people.”
After humming the melody to the Punany rhythm, the chanter stopped midway his delivery and he praised the music of Jamaica for opening his eyes and mind, and those of a wide cross section of Africans who looked to the Caribbean island’s music for inspiration.
“It is your music that opened many eyes. Keep your eyes and minds on Africa,” he said

After humming the melody to the Punany rhythm, the chanter stopped midway his delivery and he praised the music of Jamaica for opening his eyes and mind, and those of a wide cross section of Africans who looked to the Caribbean island’s music for inspiration.

“It is your music that opened many eyes. Keep your eyes and minds on Africa,” he said.

He performed songs like By Far, Bad Man from Kamwokya, Freedom among others.
While most members of the audience could not understand his Luganda lyrics, they could be seen bobbing to the music.
Watch the video here:

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