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Date with a celeb : Ghetto President Kyagulanyi Ssentamu aka Bobi Wine meets fan Mohammed Ali

Bobi Wine and Mohammed Ali in his Fire Records Studio in Kamwokya.   Photo By Ismail Kezaala

Bobi Wine and Mohammed Ali in his Fire Records Studio in Kamwokya. Photo By Ismail Kezaala

(The president and Ali met at his office at his newly opened Ssemakokilo Plaza in Kamwokya  and shared some light moments.)

Did you ever get a chance to meet Jennifer Musisi in person after your song Tugambire Ku Jennifer became a massive hit?
Actually, I have not met her but the media made such a big deal out of it that it seemed as though it was necessary for us to have a face-off. I’m glad she took the advice in the song and reduced on her high handedness.

When reaching out to such a high profile individual, are you not intimidated?
I don’t know if you closely listen to my songs but in one of my songs By Far, I said, “We’re bad man we don’t fear intimidation.” So, I don’t dread anything because I’m sure it isn’t against the law. I’m not a criminal. Bobi Wine is a decent law abiding citizen of Uganda. For example, now, why would you fear me? You only need to respect me not to fear me, and that’s what I do. I respect people of higher authority for being civil servants.

How sour is the bad blood between you and Bebe Cool?
I don’t have beef with anyone, much less Bebe Cool. He has beef with himself. We are both artistes but there is a difference in our thoughts, two different worlds and ideologies. The only problem he has is that he takes me too seriously, he keeps a close watch on what I do and yet I don’t take him seriously at all. As a result of keeping watch over what I do, he falls a victim to my infuriating charm. I infuriate him and yet to me he is a laughing stock.

Most artistes promise 2013 to be their year, do you think you might have a piece of it?
I don’t know, what I sing is inspirational. I live each day as it comes. However with business, I plan out my schedules, for music I don’t. Whatever i’ll sing about this year, you’ll easily relate to what has transpired throughout the year, what happens to me, to my people in the ghetto, to family and relatives, friends, my mind, imagination and the society around me.

How do you go about your responsibilities on an ideal day?
I don’t have an ideal day, all my days are different. I have no formula for how I manage to be all these things but somehow I get all of them accomplished.  I won’t say I give my kids all the time they need with me but I do give them enough time, after which I head for my office here on Ssemakokilo Plaza. It’s from here that I project what to do at different meetings and appointments. Thrice a week I go to my One Love Beach in Busabbala to inspect it. Music takes 10 per cent of my day.

Unlike today where young people are “after mice,” how did you remain focused on one woman?
I’m a Muganda and I grew up in a very upright family where values came first. Values like religion, culture, respect and humility. Growing up, I never at any one moment in time see my dad lay a finger on my mum, it taught me that whatever misunderstanding may arise with you partner, talking about it is the best remedy. And besides, I first made my partner my best friend.

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