Connect
To Top

Scenes from Namugongo as Martyrs Day is marked

Skewers of roasted pork over fire, with revelers waiting for their share. Many business people engaged in roasting and frying of pork are in business during celebrations of Uganda Martyrs Day, before and on the day and night of the event as some of the revelers ritually consider enjoying pork as part of the celebrations. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE

Locals in a temporary bar, celebrating Uganda Martyrs Day over booze. One of the revelers though seems ‘wasted’, perhaps after a night of a booze drinking binge. It is likely that many of the pilgrims are not aware of the reason the Uganda Martyrs lost their lives. For some, it is another public day to drink, eat and make merry. 23 Anglican and 22 Catholic converts and some Muslim died because of their faith in 1885 at the hands and orders of Kabaka (King) Mwanga the second. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE.

ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL: Reveller in a get-together session of enjoying locally-made drink locally known as Malwa, hot millet brew, drank from a single pot. This was at the sidelines of the Uganda Martyrs Day celebrations in Namugongo, near the shrine. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE

Patrons enjoy beer and converse in a temporary bar, their version of celebrating Uganda Martyrs Day. Namugongo, the home of the Uganda Martyrs Shrine is clustered with a number of bars and eateries where people stop to enjoy a drink and eat. Many do not make it for prayers because the night that precedes June 3rd when Martyrs Day is celebrated, is partly characterized by patrons drinking booze and feasting on meats like pork. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE.

Two local businessmen, help one another to prepare pork to feed and sell to pilgrims that turned up to celebrate Uganda Martyrs Day at Uganda Martyrs Shrine in Namugongo, near Kampala. Pork is one of the delicacies enjoyed during the celebrations. Photos by EDGAR R. BATTE.

A man slaughters a pig on dirty, bare ground in one of the villages in Namugongo. Pork preparation is big business during the Uganda Martyrs Day celebration on June 3rd in remembrance of 23 Anglican and 22 Catholic converts and some Muslim martyrs who died because of their faith in 1885 at the hands and orders of Kabaka (King) Mwanga the second. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE.

A dingy sectionof one of the pathways, , of stagnant dirty waters filled with old plastics and other rubbish, through a village in Namugongo, near the Uganda Martyrs Shrine. Owing to the heavy human traffic, many locals used such pathways to find their way out of the holy grounds after mass was said and celebrated. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE

BIG BUSINESS: A woman transacts business, selling locally-made potent brew to revelers in a temporary bar setting in one of the villages in Namugongo. As enjoyoyed the local brew, known as Tontomela (do not knock me over), revelers occasionally sang and danced. Many of such revelers do not attend mass which is the big celebration for the Uganda Martyrs. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE

DRINKING AND SMOKING: Locals within the outskirts of Namugongo take it slow, smoking and sipping on locally-made infusions, locally known as Tontomela (don’t knock me over). Whereas June 3rd is meant to celebrate Uganda Martyrs Day, for Christians and Muslims who died for their faith, many people have found reason to drink and make merry on the public holiday. Photo by EDGAR R. BATTE.

 

 

Submit your comment

More in Events