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Connie’s tiffs : The price of fame

Sometimes the price one pays for fame is way too high. I mean, one has to keep up appearances and live to society’s tune, whether it makes or does not make sense. Take an example of the story doing rounds about Navio’s self-proclamation of being the richest Ugandan artiste while conducting a TV interview recently.
Trust Ugandans and jumping onto anything without even analysing the context with which it was structured. Of course this comes with the insults on social media backed by the uncalled for comparisons.
But come to think of it, this guy has been around at least since 2000, doing his music and growing in our faces. His life, background (in terms of family) is to a large extent not a secret to the public. Navio has managed to craft a good reputation within the music industry. We have not heard him in a serious feud with fellow artistes, trampling all over the upcoming artistes,  taking credit where it is not due, blah blah blah.
So, if he is indeed the type that wanted to brag (the way most of our local artistes do) why would he have to wait until now? I mean if it is his character, he would have done so ages ago. Like the other local group, he would have sang songs about his father, mother, grandparents, schools he went to, number of kids he can/intends to father, marriage plans, jeezzz … the list goes on!
My points is, before everyone gets to the judging table to draw all sorts of conclusions about his personality, they should not forget the facts that stand out straight in their faces. But then, what is wrong with talking about the obvious? I doubt that he was throwing anything new to our faces (especially his target audience). I mean, isn’t his success story open to all of us? Isn’t it obvious to us that he has his own record label, has shared the limelight with some key international artistes, has had his music videos playing on a couple of international music channels, scooped some good awards and nominations?
So what is wrong if the dude talks about his success? Does it always have to come with a bitter taste? Talk of being seriously African, where everyone thinks that the perfect description of humility is remaining silent about your achievements while you wait for the rest of the world to recognise you and do the blowing for you!
Well, I believe there is nothing wrong with enjoying one’s hard earned success. How they do it is entirely up to them. We have seen people making a mountain out of mole hills like setting foot in a plane to Dubai and let them be, right?

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