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Connie’s tiffs : Parenting lessons from the Buzz Leavers Rock

As I braved the heavy traffic jam on my way to Garden City on Saturday, I could not help but notice the different teens’ dresscodes with the interesting “walks” to match. Yes, the teens looked excited, they looked all ready to have a blast and a good number of them startled so many eyes. Like that parent who yelled out from his car (in evident shock) upon seeing the daughter and friends all clad and matching in excitement to the venue. Never mind the ruckus, father and daughter drove off after the drama. Oh! The things some parents go through.
As if that was not enough, while parking in the basement, my eyes caught a glimpse of several female teens changing into skimpier outfits. Okay, I felt like giving these ones some serious kiboks. The most annoying part was that, at one point, I spotted this evidently mature team guys playing knights in shining armour to a trio of some pretty young innocent girls as they offered them a changing place in the back seat of their car before supergluing and walking with them to the party, while trying so hard to keep up with the teen vibe and slang. Some mature peeps can be real nags, eeish!
My mind quickly switched to the shocked parent as I wondered about the many others who probably did not know about their children’s whereabouts.
And tell me something, is it so hard for some parents to keep tabs with their children and play their parental roles? I mean I do not understand how one can leave home going for a party and their parents are not aware- such madness!
Having experienced the possibility of growing up and enjoying an open relationship with my parents, I find such cases of children walking out of home all dressed up like saints and eventually dashing off to the next parking lot to change into something wacky before hitting the nearest supermarket for some alcohol in the name of having fun ridiculous.
And although he might come off as “too much” sometimes, I guess it would not be such a bad idea if some parents borrowed a leaf from Frank Gashumba’s relationship with his daughter, TV personality – Sheila Gashumba (a teen). I mean keep tabs with them, get to know their interests, support and guide them where necessary, be a friend, be part of their life in every sense, so that when they fail or make you proud, it does not come off as a shock and you can complement or rebuke them accordingly.
Otherwise this whole business of acting all busy then getting close to having an attack (like that father at the roundabout) when reality strikes because the children embraced all sorts of habits from God knows where just does not make sense.
That said, such parties are meant to give the teens a sense of belonging by having some “clean” fun in the open and I sure hope that most of them did just that.

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