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Connie’s tiffs : Don’t criticise BBA housemates if you didn’t audition


Finally, Big Brother Hotshots was officially launched on Sunday. As a common case, millions across the continent watched as the housemates showcased their talents and offered entertainment. Of course this was followed by the usual online buzz, in form of rants, appreciation and disses – This Is the New Africa a.k.a. Tina indeed.
My focus is on a couple of Ugandans who will always try to live up to the adage – “There is no prophet in his own home”, from claiming that their country can do better to acting all embarrassed of the entire situation as if they are a bunch of saints or perfect beings gracing the face of the earth.
If you took time to watch and read the many lines that followed the “hotshots” from Uganda after they walked on the BBA stage, then you probably know what I am talking about. Okay, I understand we had a couple of OMG moments especially with Esther Akakankwasa but I wondered if any of the critics had ever taken the time to apply and make it through the auditions before going, “What were they thinking?”
I mean, the last time I checked, before getting into the house, Multichoice, announces all the nitty gritties with regards to application forms, auditions for the upcoming Big Brother season and where they will take place. This can only imply that anyone who believes they have what it takes to be on this show can go and audition, right?
So where were you, who believes that you are in possession of the X-factor when Esther Akankwasa and Stellah Nantumbwe aka Ellah braved whatever processes to get into the house and expose how “local” or “unlocal” they are?
Then, what gives anyone the right to sit, judge and dictate their behaviour when they hardly know what it takes or even took the trouble to set foot in that direction?
Unless there is proof of any foul play in the selection phase, but to those who blame the organisers for choosing these people, what would you want them to do if out of the blind, the one eyed person is that seemingly fake contestant ready to walk the talk? Have we all thought about the fact that the people whom we all believe have what it takes, yes the many names mentioned during the criticising sessions amidst wishes might lack the confidence or interest to participate in such shows, yet the ship has to move?
So how about we either deal with the fact that that “embarrassment” is representing this country and wish them well or rise to the occasion, snap out of the back seat (that only waits to critic and yap even when its uncalled for) get into the house and show Uganda how it’s done, the next time such an opportunity avails itself?



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