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What a debut from Tuwangye

Tuwangye on stage. Richard Tuwangye’s Laugh Conquers All one-man show was held as one of the activities planned to commemorate Fun Factory’s 10-year anniversary that will be crowned with a big fest in December. (PHOTO BY EDGAR R. BATTE)

There is a thin line between being funny and being silly. And Richard Tuwangye expertly avoided the latter with finesse last Friday during his Laugh Conquers All one-man show. No wonder he got a standing ovation.

The ladies chose their moments brilliantly and intelligently interrupted the show with excited screams of “Uganda’s Kevin Hart, Uganda’s Kevin Hart”.

Tuwangye’s one hour on stage was a wealth of humour, enriched with knowledge across different aspects of life and cultures. He also stayed abreast with the common man’s daily pressing issues. It was hard to believe Tuwangye was even doing a solo show for the first time. Many a time after such shows, some people mumble about the shortcomings of an artiste’s performance but even the hardnosed critics will struggle to find any fault with this night.

The Fun Factory comedian stepped onto the stage reminding everyone that he started out as a crooner. Jazz Freak Band drummed up their instruments and the main man of the night gave a more than decent attempt at Shaggy’s Angel.

He got the gallery singing along before mixing it up with some vernacular words and later abandoning it altogether after honestly declaring – cue in his animated face – that he did not know the rest of the lyrics.

In a free-style presentation, Tuwangye mocked the towering seven-footer lad that presented him the microphone about how he felt being that tall and not even knowing where the Shs90b is – the BoU scandal – before he soothed the shorter people that they aren’t disadvantaged but rather compact and should look at themselves as useful just like there is a Samsung Galaxy and Samsung Mini Tab.

Looking suave in a waist coast, Tuwangye took us to Ogaland, pulling off the Nigerian accent with relative ease and recalled his experience in Nollywood as they shot a film. Yes, in Nigeria they call it a film not a movie.

He spilled the beans on his childhood life in Masaka where he grew up as he detailed the trials and tribulations of having a one Uncle Sula, who always goaded their family and his journey to Kampala. It was at this juncture that his wife Sharon got extraordinary recognition as he spoke of the endless advice the parents offered — some of which he stills find ridiculous.

Tuwangye remained relevant for the millennials by saluting Fresh Kid albeit having his doubts about his rightful age.  There was also the jibe of Bad Black begging for ice cubes to cool off the heat soon after finding herself in hell and about Banyakore’s unintentional showboating when they first touch ‘some money’.  He also joked about how police were now using letter ‘H’ to arrest drink-driving. A mere mention of ‘Hullo’ or  your name, say Hannington, was enough to send you to the coolers because pronouncing ‘H’ easily betrays ones breath.

Tuwangye’s solo debut was full of news parody, political satire and the funny side of life, and it evidently left revellers yearning for more and him, able to be inspired to do it again.

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