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The guy behind Fik Fameica’s success songs

Making hits: In 2016 when Fik Fameica had a musical breakthrough with the song Pistol. Following the success of that song, the rapper signed up with Producer Artin Pro and the two have worked together since. Lawrence Ogwal spoke to Artin Pro, real name Martin Musoke about what makes him what he is and why he has mastered the art of copy and paste.

Are you Fik Fameica’s personal producer?
Many people refer to me as Fik Fameica’s personal producer but no, I am not. It is just that he trusts me to do most of his production because he was one of the artistes who believes in me.
When was the first time you worked with him?
In 2016 after I got a job at Keiton Records, a studio in Makindye and my first project was Omulembe featuring Lil Pazo, Topic Kasente, Da Agent, Fik Fameica and Dokta Brain, among others. It was after that song that Fameica chose to work with me until now.

Fik Fameica

Fik Fameica

How would you rate Fik Fameica at the time you started working with him?
At that time, he was a good artiste trying to make it to the top. He had songs such as Pistol, Mbega Wabala and Mutuwulira, which were doing well. Together, we started with Byenyenya, which did very well and made a name for us. We followed that with Kutama, Kachima and Mafia. The other songs I did for him were collaborations.
Your partnership started with copied sounds, and it seems you continue doing so. Is that what you master in?
I have always explained it this way; When your child resembles your neighbour it does not mean it is the neighbour’s child. When Fik Fameica’s songs sound like other songs, it does not mean he stole the song.
Don’t you think the lack of originality lessens your credibility?
Instead of Ugandans hating on Fik Fameica, they should be applauding him for the good work done. Fik Fameica has tried to bring art in the music industry by picking a leaf from artistes in the outside world. What he is trying to do is bring old art to the present and an example I would give is that if our local artistes were not redoing songs from people like Elly Wamala, the young generation would not know that such artistes existed.
Do you support other artistes doing what Fik Fameica is doing?
It takes art for an artiste to do what Fik Fameica does because when he borrows a vibe from a variety of songs or inspirations and they come out good, he needs some respect put on his name. Besides, Fefe Bussi borrowed a vibe from E-40’s song Choices and localised it to Yes/No. Ugandans danced to it and it was how Choices by E-2o became popular in Uganda.
Do you think “copying and pasting” songs is what has made you and Fameica big in the industry?
I am not comfortable when you call the songs copy and paste because I have done original songs such as Kachima, Gwe Abisobola featuring Byaxy and Movie featuring Tip Swizzy and Feffe Bussi. All those were original compositions. Fik Fameica has put in a lot of effort in his music and it is the reason he is still winning. I am big not because I have done copy and paste but because I have done hit songs for many local artistes.
What are some of the hit songs you have done?
Slay Queen by Chozen Blood, Dance Body by TIP Swizzy, Echo by Wizard Order featuring Daxx Kartel, Wanyonona by B2C and Gwe Abisobola by Fik Fameica featuring Byaxy among other songs.
How did you join music production?
I joined this industry out of curiosity in 2015 while in Kikoni during my S.6 vacation. I wanted to become a musician but instead when I went to studio, I wanted to find out how music producers came out with sounds.
Which studio was it?
The studio was called M.1 Studio owned by John Mary, a gospel artiste and contemporary producer. He taught me how to produce music and I started with young artistes whose music was not promoted, so the songs were not hits. I worked there for a year and worked as a ghost producer on songs that I do not want to mention.
How did you end up at Jahlive Studio?
While at M.1, someone tipped me off about a music producer job at Keiton Records in Makindye. I went to try out at the new studios and I was hired on the first day. While at Keiton, I received a good offer to go and work for Jahlive and I did not think twice.
Do you ever think of owning your own studio?
I believe in doing things at my own pace. When time for starting up my own studio comes, why not. I will embrace the chance and give it a try.

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